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Which of the following is equal to 8 1/3?

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    Which of the following is equal to 8 1/3?

    Which of the following is equal to 8 1/3( equavalent to 2 in decimal form)?

    A) 7^(3/3) ( which is equal to 7)
    B) 7^(4/3) ( which is equal to 13.39)
    C) 7^(5/8) (which is equal to 3.37)
    D) 8^(3/3) (which is equal to 8)
    E) 8^(4/3) ( which is equal to 16)

    How are we suppose to trust that answers are right in these quizzes?

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    Quote Originally Posted by LNguyen View Post
    Which of the following is equal to 8 1/3( equavalent to 2 in decimal form)?

    A) 7^(3/3) ( which is equal to 7)
    B) 7^(4/3) ( which is equal to 13.39)
    C) 7^(5/8) (which is equal to 3.37)
    D) 8^(3/3) (which is equal to 8)
    E) 8^(4/3) ( which is equal to 16)

    How are we suppose to trust that answers are right in these quizzes?
    8 1/3 = 8 + 0.33 = 8.33
    7 4/3 = 7 + 1.33 = 8.33

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  5. LNguyen is offline Junior Member
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    Symbol misunderstanding

    Quote Originally Posted by mbaxter1 View Post
    8 1/3 = 8 + 0.33 = 8.33
    7 4/3 = 7 + 1.33 = 8.33
    I understand now. For future references "^" means to the power of, therefore

    7(4/3) is not the same as 7^(4/3). That is saying "seven raised to the power of 4/3" which would give you a totally different answer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LNguyen View Post
    Which of the following is equal to 8 1/3( equavalent to 2 in decimal form)?

    A) 7^(3/3) ( which is equal to 7)
    B) 7^(4/3) ( which is equal to 13.39)
    C) 7^(5/8) (which is equal to 3.37)
    D) 8^(3/3) (which is equal to 8)
    E) 8^(4/3) ( which is equal to 16)

    How are we suppose to trust that answers are right in these quizzes?
    Best way to process fractions is to break it down to a pure fraction form.

    So 8 (1/3),

    Multiply the whole number by the denominator (8*3=24) then add it to the numerator. (24+1=25).

    So 8 1/3 = 25/3

    If you repeat the same process for each of the possible solutions, all but one answer has a denominator of 3. If none of the answers with the three denominator equal 25/3 you can determine that the last option has to be correct.

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  9. CQCmaster is offline Junior Member Pro Subscriber
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbozarth View Post
    Best way to process fractions is to break it down to a pure fraction form.

    So 8 (1/3),

    Multiply the whole number by the denominator (8*3=24) then add it to the numerator. (24+1=25).

    So 8 1/3 = 25/3

    If you repeat the same process for each of the possible solutions, all but one answer has a denominator of 3. If none of the answers with the three denominator equal 25/3 you can determine that the last option has to be correct.
    That is not what the question is asking. This is an error on part by testguy. Exponents and addition are two different animals 😁

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    Yeah, either the question or the answers were entered incorrectly. They do not match.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CQCmaster View Post
    That is not what the question is asking. This is an error on part by testguy. Exponents and addition are two different animals 😁
    Where did the exponents come from? My version of this question didn't have exponents only whole number and fraction.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mbaxter1 View Post
    Where did the exponents come from? My version of this question didn't have exponents only whole number and fraction.
    Either the original poster added them, or there is an exam question that was entered improperly. It seems like the poster may have typed it in wrong...

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