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Just a Reminder

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    Just a Reminder

    Always check the arc flash rating sticker located on the equipment to determine proper PPE needed to open, inspect, or work on equipment. If there isn't an arc flash rating sticker assigned to that equipment; the technician should refer to NFPA 70E before moving forward.

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    Quote Originally Posted by romeroduke View Post
    Always check the arc flash rating sticker located on the equipment to determine proper PPE needed to open, inspect, or work on equipment. If there isn't an arc flash rating sticker assigned to that equipment; the technician should refer to NFPA 70E before moving forward.
    What do you guys do when you find a label that says "Dangerous! No Safe PPE exists"?

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  5. Jrmcritical's Avatar
    Jrmcritical is offline
    NICET Level I (ID: 150100)
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    Quote Originally Posted by samair99 View Post
    What do you guys do when you find a label that says "Dangerous! No Safe PPE exists"?
    Funny you bring that up. A particular hospital that we do work for in NYC does not allow that signage or verbiage and will actually remove the pages from their arc flash analysis when this condition exists (which is quite common, as the utility coming in in manhattan contributes around 200kA of fault current.

    It was explained to me that by posting the "Dangerous! No Safe PPE exists" labels they cannot allow their in-house or any contracted electrician to operate a switch on that board. By removing that label, the person operating the switch is responsible for determining the appropriate PPE levels.

    This brings up a newly arising issue. With the availability of 200kAIC rated circuit breakers, much more distribution will be subject to higher fault currents. With the insane cost of real estate in NYC, many sites are moving away from switch and fuse and going with breakers. By doing this they can significantly reduce the footprint of some switchboards.

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